Usage Data Guide

 
 

Here is your guide to inputting your organisations’ usage data based on the guidance provided by the UK Government Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Conversion Factors for Company Reporting for 2020.

If you need further support please contact us at carbon@worldlandtrust.org

 
  • Units

    Enter the usage of biofuels in kg or litres.

    Scope

    Biofuels fall under Scope 1.

    ​Definition

    Biofuels are liquid fuels produced directly or indirectly from organic material.

    Breakdown of biofuel types

    • Bioethanol = Renewable fuel derived from common crops (such as sugar cane and sugar beet).
    • Biodiesel = Renewable fuel almost exclusively derived from common natural oils (for example, vegetable oils).
    • Biomethane = The methane constituent of biogas. Biogas comes from anaerobic digestion of organic matter.
    • Biodiesel (from used cooking oil) = Renewable fuel almost exclusively derived from common natural oils (such as vegetable oils).
    • Biodiesel (from tallow) = Renewable fuel almost exclusively derived from common natural oils (such as animal fats).

    Outside of scope reporting

    Currently carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of biofuels are counted as 0. However, they can be reported as outside of scopes.

    How to collect and add usage data

    Use the data on how many kg or litres have been consumed. For example, look at the number of kg/litres of fuel purchased in a year.

  • Units

    Enter usage in tonnes.

    Scope

    Biogas fall under Scope 1.

    Definition

    Biomass are solid fuels produced directly or indirectly from organic material, including plant materials and animal waste.

    Breakdown of biofuel types

    • Wood logs.
    • Wood chips.
    • Wood pellets = Compressed low quality wood (such as sawdust and shavings) made into pellet form.
    • Grass/straw.

    Outside of scope reporting

    Currently carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of biomass are counted as 0. However, they can be reported as outside of scopes.

    How to collect and add usage data

    Use the data on how many tonnes have been consumed. For example, look at the number of tonnes of biomass purchased in a year.

  • Units

    Enter usage in tonnes.

    Scope

    Biogas fall under Scope 1.

    Definition

    Biogas are gaseous fuels produced directly or indirectly from organic material, including waste.

    Breakdown of biofuel types

    • Biogas = A naturally occurring gas from the anaerobic digestion of organic materials (such as sewage and food waste) or produced intentionally as a fuel from the anaerobic digestion of biogenic substances (such as energy crops and agricultural residues).
    • Landfill gas = Gas collected from a landfill site. This may be used for electricity generation, collected and purified for use as a transport fuel, or be flared off.
    • Outside of scope reporting.

    Currently carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of biogases are counted as 0. However, they can be reported as outside of scopes.

    How to collect and add usage data

    Use the data on how many tonnes have been consumed. For example, look at the number of tonnes of biomass purchased in a year.

  • Units

    Passenger.km = The distance travelled by individual passengers per transport mode.

    Scope

    Air travel falls under Scope 3 reporting of emissions for individuals flying for work purposes.

    You can also report using your reporting currency, based on your preference/availability of distance data.

    How to collect the data

    If you have a travel agent that you use to book your flights and you want to report on your air travel on a yearly basis. You can request an annual report from your dedicated travel agent, which reports the distances travelled for domestic, short-haul and long-haul flights, in each class of travel (ranging from economy to first class).

    If you do not have a travel agent or want to report more regularly. Instead, use you expense system to note the flight type, distance and class of travel each time an employee flies.

    Breakdown of travel type

    • Domestic, to/from UK = Domestic flights are those between UK airports.
    • Short-haul, to/from UK = International flights to/from the UK, typically to Europe (up to 3700km distance).
    • Long-haul, to/from UK = Long-haul international flights to/from the UK, typically to non-European destinations (over 3700km distance).
    • International, to/from non-UK = International flights to/from non-UK countries.

    Class

    This refers to the seat class that the was purchased for the flight.

  • Units

    • Km travelled.
    • Miles travelled.

    Currency spent on rail tickets.

    Scope

    This includes business purposes in assets not owned or directly operated by a business. This includes mileage for business purposes in cars owned by employees, public transport, hire cars, and so on. If road travel matches these criteria it falls under Scope 3.

    How to collect usage data

    If you know or can calculate the distance travelled by train enter this information in km or miles. If this information is not available or you do not have the time to calculate the distance use the amount spent on rail travel. You accounts department should have the receipts available.

    Breakdown of travel type

    • National rail.
    • International rail.
    • Light rail and tram.
    • London underground.

     

  • Units

    • Km travelled.
    • Miles travelled.

    Currency spent on fuel for road travel

    Scope

    This category should be used for travel for business purposes in assets not owned or directly operated by a business. This includes mileage for business purposes in cars owned by employees, public transport, hire cars, and so on. If road travel matches these criteria it falls under Scope 3.

    How to collect data

    Either figure out the distance travelled using online mapping or enter the amount spent on fuel for road travel in the vehicle type selected.

    Breakdown of travel type

    • Mini = This is the smallest category of car sometimes referred to as a city car. Examples include: Citroën C1, Fiat/Alfa Romeo 500 and Panda, Peugeot 107, Volkswagen up!, Renault TWINGO, Toyota AYGO, smart fortwo and Hyundai i 10.
    • Supermini = This is a car that is larger than a city car, but smaller than a small family car. Examples include: Ford Fiesta, Renault CLIO, Volkswagen Polo, Citroën C2 and C3, Opel Corsa, Peugeot 208, and Toyota Yaris.
    • Lower medium = This is a small, compact family car. Examples include: Volkswagen Golf, Ford Focus, Opel Astra, Audi A3, BMW 1 Series, Renault Mégane and Toyota Auris.
    • Upper medium = This is classed as a large family car. Examples include: BMW 3 Series, ŠKODA Octavia, Volkswagen Passat, Audi A4, Mercedes Benz C Class and Peugeot 508.
    • Executive = These are large cars. Examples include: BMW 5 Series, Audi A5 and A6, Mercedes Benz E Class and Skoda Superb.
    • Luxury = This is a luxury car which is niche in the European market. Examples include: Jaguar XF, Mercedes-Benz S-Class, .BMW 7 series, Audi A8, Porsche Panamera and Lexus LS.
    • Sports = Sport cars are a small, usually two seater with two doors and designed for speed, high acceleration, and manoeuvrability. Examples include: Mercedes-Benz SLK, Audi TT, Porsche 911 and Boxster, and Peugeot RCZ.
    • Dual purpose 4X4 = These are sport utility vehicles (SUVs) which have off-road capabilities and four-wheel drive. Examples include: Suzuki Jimny, Land Rover Discovery and Defender, Toyota Land Cruiser, and Nissan Pathfinder.
    • MPV = These are multipurpose cars. Examples include: Ford C-Max, Renault Scenic, Volkswagen Touran, Opel Zafira, Ford B-Max, and Citroën C3 Picasso and C4 Picasso.

    Vehicle size breakdown

    • Small car = Petrol/LPG/CNG – up to a 1.4-litre engine.
    • Diesel – up to a 1.7-litre engine.
    • Others – vehicles models of a similar size (i.e. market segment A or B).
    • Medium car = Petrol/LPG/CNG – from 1.4-litre to 2.0-litre engine.
    • Diesel – from 1.7-litre to 2.0-litre engine.
    • Others – vehicles models of a similar size (i.e. generally market segment C).
    • Large car = Petrol/LPG/CNG – 2.0-litre engine +.
    • Diesel – 2.0-litre engine +.
    • Others – vehicles models of a similar size (i.e. generally market segment D and above).
    • Average car = Unknown engine size.

     

  • Units

    • kg.
    • $ spend (spend in USD).
    • £ spend (spend in GBP).
    • Tonne (metric tonne).

    Scope

    Chemicals and chemical products fall under Scope 3.

    Breakdown of chemical type

    • All purpose cleaner = Cleaning chemical for all surfaces.
    • All purpose cleaner = Embodied emissions from all purpose cleaner product made by method.

    Chemicals: Average

    • Detergent = Detergent for cleaning / washing.
    • Detergent spend = The spend on detergent products.
    • Dish soap (washing up liquid) = Liquid detergent for washing dishes by hand.
    • Dish soap (washing up liquid): Ecover = Liquid for dishes / washing up. Ecover brand.
    • Hand wash = Liquid soap for washing hands.
    • Ink = Ink average.

     

  • Units

    $ spend (spend in USD).
    £ spend (spend in GBP).

    Scope

    Computers fall under Scope 3.

    Definition

    Computer spend includes purchases of computer equipment and the spend on tangible computer items such as laptops. Use ‘electrical items’ for any other piece electrical item purchased, such as printers.

    Breakdown of computer type

    Average computers.

  • The construction category should be used to report on consumption of procured materials based on their origin (that is, comprised of primary material or recycled materials). For primary materials, this covers the extraction, primary processing, manufacturing and transporting materials to the point of sale, not the materials in use. For secondary materials, this covers sorting, processing, manufacturing and transporting to the point of sale, not the materials in use. This is useful for reporting efficiencies gained through reduced procurement of material or the benefit of procuring items that are the product of a previous recycling process.

    Units

    Measured in tonnes.

    ​Scope

    This falls under scope 3 reporting.

    How to gather data

    Examples of companies: Company K reports its emissions from purchasing steel cans made from primary metals (to be filled with a product and sold).

    At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing metals that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process (also to be filled with a product and sold).

    For the procurement of cans that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘metal steel cans’ material type and selects the ‘primary material production’ conversion factor.

    For the procurement of cans that are made from second-generation metals that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘metal steel cans’ row and the ‘closed-loop’ conversion factor. The carbon benefits of procuring the second generation metals quickly becomes clear.

    The activity data for each site (tonnes of metal procured) are multiplied by the relevant conversion factor to produce company K’s Scope 3 procured material emissions.

    Aggregates

    • Average construction.
    • Asbestos.
    • Asphalt.
    • Bricks.
    • Concrete.
    • Insulation.
    • Metals.
    • Soils.
    • Mineral oil.
    • Plasterboard.
    • Tyres.
    • Wood.

     

  • Unit

    Enter the usage in km travelled.

    Scope

    Freighting good fall under scope 3 reporting.

    Guidance

    Freighting goods factors should be used specifically for the shipment of goods over land, by sea or by air through a third-party company. Factors are available for a whole vehicle’s worth of goods or per tonne of goods shipped via a specific transport mode.

  • Units

    $ spend (spend in USD).
    £ spend (spend in GBP).

    Scope

    Detergent use falls under Scope 3.

    Definition

    Usage based on currency spent on detergent products.

    Breakdown of detergent type

    Detergent spend = The spend on detergent products

  • Scope

    Electrical items fall under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of electrical item types

    • Fridges and freezers.
    • Large electrical items = Stationary machines for routine housekeeping tasks (such as cookers and fridges).
    • Mixed size electrical items.
    • Small electrical items = Small power equipment.
    • Batteries (Excludes car batteries).

    How to collect and enter the data

    Example: Company K reports its emissions from purchasing steel cans made from primary metals (to be filled with a product and sold). At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing metals that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process (also to be filled with a product and sold). For the procurement of cans that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘metal steel cans’ material type and selects the ‘primary material production’ conversion factor. For the procurement of cans that are made from second-generation metals that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘metal steel cans’ row and the ‘closed-loop’ conversion factor. The carbon benefits of procuring the second-generation metals quickly becomes clear.

    The activity data for each site (tonnes of metal procured) are multiplied by the relevant conversion factor to produce company K’s Scope 3 procured material emissions.

  • Units

    kWh
    $ spend (spend in USD).
    £ spend (spend in GBP).

    Scope

    UK electricity includes electricity used by an organisation at sites owned/controlled by them. This is reported as a Scope 2, indirect emissions.

    Definition

    Electricity used by an organisation at sites owned / controlled by them.

    Breakdown of electricity type

    Electricity types are defined by the location of your facility. You could choose the suitable type with reference to the location of the facility of your organisation. For example, if the facility of your organisation is located in the United Kingdom, please choose “Electricity: UK”.

  • Units

    Passenger.km
    $ spend (spend in USD).
    £ spend (spend in GBP).

    Scope

    All of the below fall under Scope 3 of emissions.

    • Employee Commuting: Air.
    • Employee Commuting: Rail.
    • Employee Commuting: Road.
    • Employee Commuting: Sea.

    Definition

    Employee commuting refers to employees commuting to their usual place of work.

    Breakdown of vehicle type

    • Average bus.
    • Black taxi.
    • Car: not owned by business.
    • Car: owned.
    • Coach.
    • Local bus.
    • London bus.
    • Motorbike: not owned by business.
    • Motorbike: owned.
    • Regular taxi.
    • Road Travel Average.

    Breakdown of fuel type

    • Average = unknown.
    • Battery Electric Vehicle.
    • CNG.
    • Diesel.
    • Hybrid.
    • LPG.
    • Petrol.
    • Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle.

    Breakdown of vehicle size

    For “Car: owned” or “Car: not owned by business”

    • Dual purpose 4X4 = These are sport utility vehicles (SUVs) which have off-road capabilities and four-wheel drive. Examples include: Suzuki Jimny, Land Rover Discovery and Defender, Toyota Land Cruiser, and Nissan Pathfinder.
    • Executive = These are large cars. Examples include: BMW 5 Series, Audi A5 and A6, Mercedes Benz E Class and Skoda Superb.
    • Lower medium = This is a small, compact family car. Examples include: Volkswagen Golf, Ford Focus, Opel Astra, Audi A3, BMW 1 Series, Renault Mégane and Toyota Auris.
    • Luxury = This is a luxury car which is niche in the European market. Examples include: Jaguar XF, Mercedes-Benz S-Class, .BMW 7 series, Audi A8, Porsche Panamera and Lexus LS.
    • MPV = These are multipurpose cars. Examples include: Ford C-Max, Renault Scenic, Volkswagen Touran, Opel Zafira, Ford B-Max, and Citroën C3 Picasso and C4 Picasso.
    • Mini = This is the smallest category of car sometimes referred to as a city car. Examples include: Citroën C1, Fiat/Alfa Romeo 500 and Panda, Peugeot 107, Volkswagen up!, Renault TWINGO, Toyota AYGO, smart fortwo and Hyundai i 10.
    • Sports = Sport cars are a small, usually two seater with two doors and designed for speed, high acceleration, and manoeuvrability. Examples include: Mercedes-Benz SLK, Audi TT, Porsche 911 and Boxster, and Peugeot RCZ.
    • Supermini = This is a car that is larger than a city car, but smaller than a small family car. Examples include: Ford Fiesta, Renault CLIO, Volkswagen Polo, Citroën C2 and C3, Opel Corsa, Peugeot 208, and Toyota Yaris.
    • Upper medium = This is classed as a large family car. Examples include: BMW 3 Series, ŠKODA Octavia, Volkswagen Passat, Audi A4, Mercedes Benz C Class and Peugeot 508
    • Average = Unknown engine size.
    • Small = Petrol/LPG/CNG – up to a 1.4-litre engine|Diesel – up to a 1.7-litre engine| Others – vehicles models of a similar size (i.e. market segment A or B).
    • Medium = Petrol/LPG/CNG – from 1.4-litre to 2.0-litre engine | Diesel – from 1.7-litre to 2.0-litre engine | Others – vehicles models of a similar size (i.e. generally market segment C).
    • Large = Petrol/LPG/CNG – 2.0-litre engine + | Diesel – 2.0-litre engine + | Others – vehicles models of a similar size (i.e. generally market segment D and above).

    For “Motorbike: owned” or “Motorbike: not owned by business”

    • Small = Mopeds/scooters up to 125cc.
    • Medium = 125cc to 500cc.
    • Large = 500cc +.
    • Average = Unknown engine size.

     

  • Unit

    Average food and drink spend.

    Scope

    Food and drink fall under scope 3 reporting.

  • This is natural gas from the grid which is the same as natural gas under gaseous fuels group. If you wish to add your usage in m3 then use the natural gas option under gaseous fuels.

    Units

    • Amount spent on Gas in your reporting currency.
    • kWh.
    • Scf – this a US gas unit standard cubic foot.

    Scope

    Gas falls under scope 1 reporting

    Breakdown of gas type

    • Average gas = if gas type unknown, not listed or bundled. This option will give you the chance to enter your usage in spend.
    • CA natural gas = Canadian natural gas.
    • DE natural gas = German natural gas.
    • FR natural gas = French natural gas.
    • SP natural gas = Spanish natural gas.
    • UK natural gas = United Kingdom natural gas.
    • US natural gas = United States natural gas.

    How to collect the data

    This information should be available on your bills from your gas supplier. If you building is managed by someone other than yourself this can be calculated by the amount you are charged for gas.

  • Units

    • kWh.
    • Litres.
    • M3.

    Scope

    Gaseous fuels fall under scope 1 reporting.

    This refers to primary fuel sources combusted at a site or in an asset owned or controlled by the reporting organisation.

    Guidance

    ‘Diesel (average biofuel blend)’/’diesel (100% mineral oil)’ – typically organisations purchasing forecourt fuel should use ‘diesel (average biofuel blend)’.

    Example: Company A needs to report the Scope 1 emissions from its natural gas and diesel use.

    For natural gas consumption it selects a kWh conversion factor on a gross CV basis – this is the basis of most energy bills. It reports in CO2e for all fuels combusted at its premises.

    It is faced with two different types of diesel conversion factors, ‘100% mineral fuel’ and ‘diesel (average biofuel blend)’. Since it fills up its vehicles at a national chain of filling stations, it selects the average biofuel blend (this is the correct conversion factor for standard forecourt fuel, which contains a small blend of biofuel).

    Since company A is reporting a type of fuel that has biofuel content, it should also account for the ‘biogenic’ part of this fuel. This will not be included in the organisation’s emissions total, but displayed separately within the emissions report. This ensures that the organisation is being transparent with regard to all potential sources of CO2 from its activities.

    Breakdown of Gaseous fuels

    • CNG = Compressed natural gas – a compressed version of the same natural gas used in homes. Stored in cylinders for use as an alternative transport fuel.
    • LNG = Liquefied natural gas- in a liquid state, this is the easiest way to transport gas in tankers (truck or ship). It can be used as an alternative transport fuel.
    • LPG = Liquid petroleum gas – used to power cooking stoves or heaters off-grid and fuel some vehicles (such as fork-lift trucks and vans).
    • UK Grid Natural gas = Standard natural gas received through the gas mains grid network in the UK Note – contains limited biogas content.
    • Other petroleum gas = Consists mainly of ethane, plus other hydrocarbons, (excludes butane and propane).

     

  • Units

    kWh

    Scope

    Heat and Steam fall under scope 2 reporting

    Heat and steam here refers to purchased heat and steam for local and district heating purposes

    Usage sub type

    • District heat and steam.
    • Onsite heat and steam.
    • Solar Thermal Consumed.
    • Solar Thermal Generated.
    • How to collect usage data.

    Example: Company I reports the emissions from the purchase of heat and steam for its ‘site 1’. It keeps records of the kWh use per year.

    At ‘site 2’, company I is on a district heating network. It keeps separate records for kWh use via the district heat and steam network since it also wishes to voluntarily report Scope 3 distribution emissions associated with this source.

  • Scope

    Hotel stays fall under scope 3 reporting.

    How to collect and enter the usage data

    First select the country that the hotel was in.

    Room.night is the the number of rooms x the number of nights. This information should be available on receipts provided by your accounts department.

  • Units

    • kWh.
    • Litre.
    • Tonnes.

    Scope

    Liquid fuels fall under scope 1 reporting.

    Breakdown of liquid fuel types

    • Aviation spirit = Fuel for piston-engined aircraft – a high octane petrol (aka AVGAS).
    • Aviation turbine fuel = Fuel for turbo-prop aircraft and jets (aka jet fuel). Similar to kerosene used as a heating fuel, but refined to a higher quality.
    • Burning oil = Main purpose is for heating/lighting on a domestic scale (also known as kerosene).
    • Diesel (average biofuel blend) = Standard diesel bought from any local filling station (across the board forecourt fuel typically contains biofuel content).
    • Diesel (100% mineral diesel) = Diesel that has not been blended with biofuel (non-forecourt diesel).
    • Fuel oil = Heavy oil used as fuel in furnaces and boilers of power stations, in industry, for industrial heating and in ships.
    • Gas oil = Medium oil used in diesel engines and heating systems (also known as red diesel).
    • Lubricants = Waste petroleum-based lubricating oils recovered for use as fuels.
    • Marine fuel oil = Residual fuels are called “Marine fuel oil”. Residual fuel or “residuum” is the fraction that did not boil, sometimes referred to as “tar” or “petroleum pitch”.
    • Marine gas oil = Distillate fuels are commonly called “Marine gas oil”. Distillate fuel is composed of petroleum fractions of crude oil that are separated in a refinery by a boiling or “distillation” process.
    • Naphtha = A product of crude oil refining – often used as a solvent.
    • Petrol (100% mineral petrol) = Petrol that has not been blended with biofuel (non forecourt petrol).
    • Petrol (average biofuel blend) = Standard petrol bought from any local filling station (across the board forecourt fuel typically contains biofuel content).
    • Processed fuel oils distillate oil = Waste oils meeting the ‘distillate’ oil definition contained in the ‘Processed Fuel Oil Quality Protocol’.
    • Processed fuel oils residual oil = Waste oils meeting the ‘residual’ oil definition contained in the ‘Processed Fuel Oil Quality Protocol’.
    • Refinery miscellaneous = Includes aromatic extracts, defoament solvents and other minor miscellaneous products.
    • Waste oils = Recycled oils outside of the ‘Processed Fuel Oil Quality Protocol’ definitions.

     

  • Units

    kWh.

    Scope

    Managed asset electricity falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Managed assets- electricity conversion factors should be used to report on electricity used at a site or in an asset not directly owned or operated by the reporting organisation (such as space in a data centre).

    Usage subtype

    Select the country within which the electricity was used.

    How to collect the data

    Example: Company P reports the emissions from the electricity it uses in its data centre, which is hosted off site by a 3rd-party supplier. Its consumption can be found in its monthly bill and is in kWh.

    The total annual kWh consumption is multiplied by the ‘electricity generation’ conversion factor to produce company P’s managed assets- electricity emissions.

  • Unit

    Km.

    Scope

    Managed asset vehicles fall under scope 3 reporting.

    Managed assets- vehicles factors should be used to report emissions from vehicles that are used by a reporting organisation, but are not owned by the organisation and generally do not appear on the organisation’s balance sheet. The emissions from managed assets are reported as a Scope 3 emissions source.

    Usage sub type

    • Managed Assets: Car.
    • Managed Assets: HGV – All HGVs.
    • Managed Assets: HGV – All artics.
    • Managed Assets: HGV – All rigids.
    • Managed Assets: HGV – Articulated (>3.5 – 33t).
    • Managed Assets: HGV – Articulated (>33t).
    • Managed Assets: HGV – Rigid (>17 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: HGV – Rigid (>3.5 – 7.5 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: HGV – Rigid (>7.5 tonnes – 17 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: HGVs refrigerated – All HGV’s.
    • Managed Assets: HGVs refrigerated – All artics.
    • Managed Assets: HGVs refrigerated – All rigids.
    • Managed Assets: HGV refrigerated – Articulated (>3.5 – 33t).
    • Managed Assets: HGV refrigerated – Articulated (>33t).
    • Managed Assets: HGV refrigerated – Rigid (>17 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: HGV refrigerated – Rigid (>3.5 – 7.5 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: HGV refrigerated – Rigid (>7.5 tonnes – 17 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: Motorbike.
    • Managed Assets: Van – Average (up to 3.5 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: Van Class I (up to 1.305 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: Van Class II (1.305 to 1.74 tonnes).
    • Managed Assets: Van Class III (1.74 to 3.5 tonnes).

    Breakdown of vehicle size of cars

    • Average = if vehicle size is unknown.
    • Mini = This is the smallest category of car sometimes referred to as a city car. Examples include: Citroën C1, Fiat/Alfa Romeo 500 and Panda, Peugeot 107, Volkswagen up!, Renault TWINGO, Toyota AYGO, smart fortwo and Hyundai i 10.
    • Supermini = This is a car that is larger than a city car, but smaller than a small family car. Examples include: Ford Fiesta, Renault CLIO, Volkswagen Polo, Citroën C2 and C3, Opel Corsa, Peugeot 208, and Toyota Yaris.
    • Lower medium = This is a small, compact family car. Examples include: Volkswagen Golf, Ford Focus, Opel Astra, Audi A3, BMW 1 Series, Renault Mégane and Toyota Auris.
    • Upper medium = This is classed as a large family car. Examples include: BMW 3 Series, ŠKODA Octavia, Volkswagen Passat, Audi A4, Mercedes Benz C Class and Peugeot 508.
    • Executive = These are large cars. Examples include: BMW 5 Series, Audi A5 and A6, Mercedes Benz E Class and Skoda Superb.
    • Luxury = This is a luxury car which is niche in the European market. Examples include: Jaguar XF, Mercedes-Benz S-Class, .BMW 7 series, Audi A8, Porsche Panamera and Lexus LS.
    • Sports = Sport cars are a small, usually two seater with two doors and designed for speed, high acceleration, and manoeuvrability. Examples include: Mercedes-Benz SLK, Audi TT, Porsche 911 and Boxster, and Peugeot RCZ.
    • Dual purpose 4X4 = These are sport utility vehicles (SUVs) which have off-road capabilities and four-wheel drive. Examples include: Suzuki Jimny, Land Rover Discovery and Defender, Toyota Land Cruiser, and Nissan Pathfinder.
    • MPV = These are multipurpose cars. Examples include: Ford C-Max, Renault Scenic, Volkswagen Touran, Opel Zafira, Ford B-Max, and Citroën C3 Picasso and C4 Picasso.

    How to collect usage data

    Example: Company Q reports the emissions from the mileage travelled in heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) on a long-term lease.

    Company Q uses conversion factors appropriate to each of its managed assets. For example, for its 12-tonne gross vehicle weight rigid HGV, it applies the ‘rigid (>7.5 tonnes-17 tonnes)’ factor. It also has some other articulated HGVs on short-term leases at a site further afield for which size remains unknown. Therefore, it uses the ‘all artics’ factor, which is an appropriate average figure.

    The total km travelled is multiplied by the appropriate conversion factor to produce company Q’s passenger vehicle emissions.

  • Scope

    Material use falls under scope 3 reporting.

    How to collect usage data

    Example: Company K reports its emissions from purchasing steel cans made from primary metals (to be filled with a product and sold). At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing metals that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process (also to be filled with a product and sold). For the procurement of cans that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘metal steel cans’ material type and selects the ‘primary material production’ conversion factor. For the procurement of cans that are made from second-generation metals that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘metal steel cans’ row and the ‘closed-loop’ conversion factor. The carbon benefits of procuring the second generation metals quickly becomes clear

    Select the metal sub-use type and enter the usage in tonnes. This is separate from metal listed under the construction category.

    Production type breakdown

    • Closed loop source = Products that are designed for recycling, recovery, or reuse that are collected and recycled in whole or part.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Primary material production = products not made from recycled products and not designed to be recycled.

     

  • Unit

    Select the material type and enter the usage in tonnes.

    Scope

    Material use falls under scope 3 reporting.

    How to enter usage data

    Example: Company K reports its emissions from materials made from primary materials. At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing materials that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process. For the procurement of materials that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘other materials’ material type (if material isn’t listed separately) and selects the ‘primary material production’. For the procurement of materials that are made from second-generation materials that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘other materials’ and the ‘closed-loop’ production type. The carbon benefits of procuring the second generation materials quickly becomes clear.

    Production type breakdown

    • Closed loop source = Products that are designed for recycling, recovery, or reuse that are collected and recycled in whole or part.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Primary material production = products not made from recycled products and not designed to be recycled.

     

  • Unit

    Select the unit you want to use (tonnes of spend).

    Then select the paper sub-type and enter the usage amount in the unit selected.

    Scope

    Material use falls under scope 3 reporting.

    How to enter usage data

    Example: Company K reports its emissions from paper made from primary materials. At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing paper that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process. For the procurement of paper that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘paper’ material type and selects the ‘primary material production’. For the procurement of paper that are made from second-generation materials that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘paper’ and the ‘closed-loop’ production type. The carbon benefits of procuring the second generation paper quickly becomes clear.

    Production type breakdown

    • Closed loop source = Products that are designed for recycling, recovery, or reuse that are collected and recycled in whole or part.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Primary material production = products not made from recycled products and not designed to be recycled.

     

  • Units

    • Tonnes.
    • $ spend (spend in USD).
    • £ spend (spend in GBP).

    Scope

    Plastic use falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Definition

    Purchase and use of plastic including plastic products such as packaging materials, film, synthetic polymers such as PVC.

    How to enter usage data

    Example: Company K reports its emissions from paper made from primary materials. At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing paper that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process. For the procurement of paper that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘paper’ material type and selects the ‘primary material production’. For the procurement of paper that are made from second-generation materials that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘paper’ and the ‘closed-loop’ production type. The carbon benefits of procuring the second generation paper quickly becomes clear.

    Select the usage sub-type (see below for explanation of the categories)

    Breakdown of Plastic subtypes

    • Bioplastics: Polylactic Acid (PLA): Thailand = Polylactic acid (PLA) is the most widely used commercial bio-based plastic with characteristics similar to polystyrene, polypropylene or polyethylene. PLA has a growing range of applications depicting improved product functionalities over traditional polymers, for example reducing the printing temperature for 3D printing filaments and extending shelf life for fresh vegetables packaged in PLA film.
      In addition, PLA offers a wide range of end-of-life options: besides mechanical or chemical recycling and (renewable) energy recovery, it offers multiple end-of-life options related to its inherent biodegradability.
    • Plastics: Average plastic film.
    • Plastics: Average plastic products.
    • Plastics: Average plastic rigid.
    • Plastics: Average plastics.
    • Plastics: HDPE (incl.forming) = An opaque plastic commonly used for milk bottles.
    • Plastics: LDPE and LLDPE (incl.forming) = Packaging material (such as foils and plastic bags).
    • Plastics: PET (incl.forming) = For example, clear drink bottles and sandwich wrappers.
    • Plastics: PP (incl.forming) = Mainly used in injection moulding (for example, for cutlery, containers and automotive parts).
    • Plastics: PS (incl.forming) = Commonly used for foam-based insulation and cheap disposable items (such as protective packaging and disposable cutlery).
    • Plastics: PVC (incl.forming) = Widespread use in building, transport, packaging, electrical/electronic and healthcare applications.

    Breakdown of production type

    • Closed loop source = Products that are designed for recycling, recovery, or reuse that are collected and recycled in whole or part.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Primary material production = Products not made from recycled products and not designed to be recycled.

     

  • Unit

    Enter the usage based on spend.

    Scope

    Material use falls under scope 3 reporting.

    How to enter usage data

    Example: Company K reports its emissions from plastic products made from primary materials. At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing plastic products that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process. For the procurement of plasic products that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘plastic products’ material type and selects the ‘primary material production’. For the procurement of plastic products that are made from second-generation materials that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘plastic products’ and the ‘closed-loop’ production type. The carbon benefits of procuring the second generation materials quickly becomes clear.

    Production type breakdown

    • Closed loop source = Products that are designed for recycling, recovery, or reuse that are collected and recycled in whole or part.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Primary material production = products not made from recycled products and not designed to be recycled.

     

  • Unit

    Select Average textiles and enter the usage in your reporting currency spend.

    Scope

    Material use falls under scope 3 reporting.

    How to enter usage data

    Example: Company K reports its emissions from textiles made from primary materials. At a separate site, company K wishes to report the emissions from purchasing textiles that are the product of a previous closed-loop recycling process. For the procurement of textiles that have been newly manufactured, it selects the ‘textiles’ material type and selects the ‘primary material production’. For the procurement of textiles that are made from second-generation materials that have already been recycled, it selects the ‘textiles’ and the ‘closed-loop’ production type. The carbon benefits of procuring the second generation materials quickly becomes clear.

    Production type breakdown

    • Closed loop source = Products that are designed for recycling, recovery, or reuse that are collected and recycled in whole or part.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Primary material production = products not made from recycled products and not designed to be recycled.

     

  • Scope

    Refrigerants fall under scope 1

    Refrigerant and other conversion factors should be used for the purpose of reporting leakage from air-conditioning, refrigeration units or the release to the atmosphere of other gases that have global warming potential (GWP).

    How to gather data and calculate

    Each year, company D needs to report on the refrigerants that leak from its air-conditioning equipment (sometimes called fugitive emissions) at its headquarters. These are considered to be Scope 1 emissions. To calculate the leakage, Company D simply notes how much it has had to ‘top-up’ the refrigerant over the last year.

    The ‘top-up’ data (in kg) is multiplied by the applicable conversion factor to the refrigerant type to produce company D’s direct emissions from refrigerant.

  • Units

    • Passenger.km = The distance travelled by individual passengers per transport mode.
    • Spend = The amount spent on sea travel in your reporting currency.

    Scope

    This category should be used to report travel for business purposes on ferries. This falls under scope 3.

    How to collect data

    Example: Company M is based on the Isle of Wight and wishes to report the emissions of business travel on the ferry.

    Company M uses the conversion factors appropriate for ferry journeys. It has two options – for a passenger travelling by car on a ferry or as a foot passenger.

    The total km travelled on the ferry is multiplied by the appropriate conversion factors to produce company M’s Scope 3 emissions at sea.

  • Units

    • kWh.
    • Tonnes.

    Scope

    Solid fuels fall under Scope 3 of emissions.

    Breakdown of solid fuels type

    • Charcoal (fuel) = Charcoal is a lightweight black carbon residue produced by strongly heating wood in minimal oxygen to remove all water and volatile constituents.
      Emissions from purchase and combustion of charcoal include the upstream embodied emissions from its production and direct emissions from combustion.
    • Coal (domestic) = Coal used domestically.
    • Coal (electricity generation) = Coal used in power stations to generate electricity.
    • Coal (electricity generation: UK coal) = Coal used in power stations to generate electricity (only for coal produced in the UK).
    • Coal (industrial) = Coal used in sources other than power stations and domestic use.
    • Coking coal = Coke may be used as a heating fuel and as a reducing agent in a blast furnace.
    • Petroleum coke = Normally used in cement manufacture and power plants.

     

  • Unit

    Usage measured in tonnes.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

    Breakdown of construction waste type

    • Waste: Aggregates.
    • Waste: Average construction.
    • Waste: Asbestos.
    • Waste: Asphalt.
    • Waste: Bricks.
    • Waste: Concrete.
    • Waste: Insulation.
    • Waste: Metals.
    • Waste: Soils.
    • Waste: Mineral oil.
    • Waste: Plasterboard.
    • Waste: Tyres.
    • Waste: Wood.

     

  • Unit

    Enter waste amount in tonnes.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

    Breakdown of Electrical item waste

    • WEEE – batteries.
    • WEEE – fridge and freezers.
    • WEEE – large.
    • WEEE – mixed.
    • WEEE – small.

     

  • Unit

    Glass has a singular category: waste: all glass. Then select the waste disposal type and enter the quantity in tonnes.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

     

  • Unit

    Select the waste metal type and disposal type and enter the quantity in tonnes.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

     

  • Unit

    Select the waste paper type and disposal type and enter the quantity in tonnes.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

     

  • Unit

    Select the waste plastic type and disposal type and enter the quantity in tonnes.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

    Breakdown of plastic types:

    • Plastics: HDPE (incl.forming) = An opaque plastic commonly used for milk bottles.
    • Plastics: LDPE and LLDPE (incl.forming) = Packaging material (such as foils and plastic bags).
    • Plastics: PET (incl.forming) = For example, clear drink bottles and sandwich wrappers.
    • Plastics: PP (incl.forming) = Mainly used in injection moulding (for example, for cutlery, containers and automotive parts).
    • Plastics: PS (incl.forming) = Commonly used for foam-based insulation and cheap disposable items (such as protective packaging and disposable cutlery).
    • Plastics: PVC (incl.forming) = Widespread use in building, transport, packaging, electrical/electronic and healthcare applications.

     

  • Unit

    Amount spent of waste disposal.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

     

  • Unit

    Select the refuse type and disposal type and enter the quantity in tonnes or Bin: 1100 litres.

    Scope

    Waste disposal falls under scope 3 reporting.

    1100 litre bins is a very common size and the ones you normally see everywhere. It is often the case that waste isn’t weighed, so this helps you to include the data. If you don’t use 1100 litre bins, but use another standard size then get in touch and we can add that in for you. We will do a rough conversion of volume to weight.

    Breakdown of disposal type

    For all waste materials select the type of waste and then the method of disposal:

    • Landfill = waste sent to landfill.
    • Closed loop source = Products that can be recycled, recovered, or reused that are collected and recycled in whole or part of the same type of product.
    • Open loop source = Products that have been made from recycled products.
    • Combustion (also know as energy from waste of EFW) = incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems described as “thermal treatment”. Incineration of waste materials converts waste in ash, flue gas, heat and energy.
    • Reuse = the materials were reused.

     

  • Units

    Select the units that you want to input your data in:

    • Litres.
    • Spend.
    • M3.

    Scope

    Water supply, treatment and disposal falls under scope 3.

    Breakdown of water categories

    • Average water = Average spend on water, including any water services, treatment and supply.
    • Grey Water and rainwater (on the app twice) = water that you have collected, either rainwater or relatively clean wastewater i.e from washing machines.
    • Water Supply = Water supply subcategory should be used to account for water delivered through the mains supply network.
    • Water treatment = Water treatment subcategory should be used for water returned into the sewage system through mains drains.

     

  • Units

    Electricity used by your web and cloud host provider(s)

    • kWh.

    Scope

    Web and Cloud Hosting falls under Scope 3: Purchased Goods and Services.