Scorched Earth to Forest Haven: Big Match Fortnight success SEARCH NEWS

CATEGORIES:

This year’s Big Match Fortnight was a huge success. So far we have raised more than 90 per cent  of our target. Thank you to everyone who supported the appeal so generously, including supporters of the Match Fund who ensured that all donations were matched pound for pound during the two weeks in October.

Will you help us raise £52,000 to reach our target?  Meanwhile your funds are already been put to good use.

ON COURSE FOR TARGET OF £575,000: What your donation means to Vietnam

Looking like it’s in fancy dress, the Red-shanked Douc is an emblem of Vietnam’s tropical forests. This Endangered primate feeds on fruit, seeds and foliage in the trees, only coming to ground occasionally. Image Viet Nature

Looking like it’s in fancy dress, the Red-shanked Douc is an emblem of Vietnam’s tropical forests. This Endangered primate feeds on fruit, seeds and foliage in the trees, only coming to ground occasionally. Image: Viet Nature

Funds raised are already enabling our partner, Viet Nature, to begin clearing the land of the invasive African grass that spread across the hillsides, following the denuding of Vietnam’s tropical forests.

Phase One of the project will see 120,000 trees being planted across 74 acres in Huong Lap and 172 acres in Huong Linh as a first step towards Viet Nature’s aim of restoring 3,500 acres of land in Bac Huong Hoa Nature Reserve.

Scientists believe that deforestation is responsible for 20 per cent of Earth’s greenhouse gases but reforestation can turn that around by stabilising rising temperatures and helping combat climate change.

TREE PLANTING  –  a solution to the climate crisis

Natural climate solutions have been high on the agenda this year and tree planting is up there at the forefront of ways to take positive climate action.

Every tree helps

Every sapling you’re funding as part of this project will begin to lock away carbon dioxide as it grows – this is a lifetime of conservation action, from the moment it is planted. As the trees grow they will help stabilise soil to recreate the original forest floor. And as the canopy is restored Vietnam’s displaced and threatened species can take up a forever home. There are major benefits for people too who will be assured cleaner water and fresh air.

Key species to save

Pygmy Slow Loris feeding on a giant stick insect

Pygmy Slow Loris feeding on a giant stick insect. Image: © Chien Lee / Minden / naturepl.com

One of the animals to succumb to habitat loss in Vietnam is the Pygmy Slow Loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus). Its forest home was targeted through large-scale burning, clearing and defoliation during and after the Vietnam war, and today extensive hunting for traditional medicines, food and collection for the pet trade continues to threaten their survival. They are listed on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and classed as Vulnerable on IUCN’s Red List. WLT’s latest appeal will help restore their forest home and keep them safe.

 

Some things you may not know about slow lorises

  • They do not leap or jump.
  • They have a toxic bite which comes from licking a toxic secretion from glands on the inside of its elbows.
  • The teeth in the lower jaw form a comb-like structure called a toothcomb that is used for scraping resin from tree bark, edible gum being one of their favourite foods.

All in all an extraordinary animal that we must save at all costs

OTHER SPECIES YOU WILL BE HELPING SAVE BY SUPPORTING OUR SCORCHED EARTH TO FOREST HAVEN APPEAL

The Annamite Striped Rabbit is an Endangered species only recently discovered. It has relatively short ears and grizzled fur with tiger-like stripes along its body. Its range is restricted to the Annamite mountains of Vietnam. Image: University of East Anglia

The Annamite Striped Rabbit is an Endangered species only recently discovered. It has relatively short ears and grizzled fur with tiger-like stripes along its body. Its range is restricted to the Annamite mountains of Vietnam. Image: University of East Anglia

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Help us reach our target by the end of the year. With only £52,000 left to raise, our goal is in sight!

There’s still time to help Vietnam’s forest creatures find a new home.

 

COMMENTS

LEAVE A COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. All fields are required

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

 

Our Appeals