Saving threatened habitats worldwide

First ever systematic data on insect diversity collected from Bolivia’s Beni savanna

16 September, 2015 - 10:58 -- World Land Trust
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Beetles
Nets for trapping insects.

A team led by Bolivian entomologist Caroli Hamel-Leigue has gathered the first ever systematic data on insect diversity and biomass in three areas of Bolivia’s Beni savanna.

The data will be used to inform grassland management strategies for Barba Azul Nature Reserve, which is owned and managed by Asociación Armonía, the Bolivian conservation partner of World Land Trust (WLT).

The field work took place over some three weeks in July 2015 after the ground had started to dry out. Various insect trapping methods were used to sample a broad range of taxonomic groups, including a group with excellent bioindicator properties, the Scarabaeinae dung beetles.

The information gathered will be used to give a better understanding of the health of the entire ecosystem. The results of the study are being compiled and a full report will be published in due course.

This study is intended as a first step in a several-year monitoring programme that will help guide future conservation on the Barba Azul Nature Reserve.

More information

In 2013 WLT used Buy an Acre funds to double the size of the Barba Azul Nature Reserve. WLT continues to raise funds to save land in Bolivia and extend the reserve for around £100 an acre.

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