Saving threatened habitats worldwide

World Land Trust assists fundraising efforts for conservation in Iran

31 July, 2014 - 16:50 -- World Land Trust
Cheetah prowling through dried grass.

World Land Trust (WLT) is helping Iranian Cheetah Society (ICS) raise funds for conservation in Iran.

ICS conservationists are working in remote and inaccessible areas of Iran to save some of the world’s most spectacular and imperilled wildlife. Against all the odds, and in the face of an international banking embargo, ICS is making ground breaking scientific discoveries and raising local awareness of conservation.

Donate to support Iranian Cheetah Society

WLT is providing assistance by receiving funds donated via an online fundraising page set up by ICS.

Donations will be used to purchase vital equipment such as camera traps which are needed to support wildlife monitoring and to help local communities and game wardens put conservation into practice.

The deserts of central Iran are territory for Asiatic Cheetah, the rolling mountains of western Iran are home to Brown Bears and Grey Wolves, and the high altitudes of northern Iran shelter Persian Leopards. ICS’s aim is to ensure a long-term future for these and lesser carnivores and their ecosystems.

Big cat study

In 2002, ICS launched a long-term study of the Asiatic Cheetah, one of the world’s least researched big cats. The programme focuses on arid areas of Iran where cheetahs are found. By recording cheetahs with remote cameras, ICS is able to monitor cheetah populations, track migration and assess survival rates.

ICS is carrying out a similar study of the Persian Leopard across a variety of habitats, using camera-traps to collect population data. In some parts of Iran leopards are in direct conflict with communities, so ICS is gathering and analysing faecal samples to identify intensity of conflict with livestock owners.

Studies have also been carried out to establish the genetic diversity of Persian Leopards in Iran, as a preliminary to possible translocation projects to countries within their historical range in west Asia.

Community conservation

ICS works with local people in Iran to give them the skills to be able to accurately identify carnivores. For example, in the past, cheetahs were killed because people were afraid of them and considered them a threat to their livestock or even to themselves.

Thanks to ICS, community-based activities in Iran in recent years have reduced the persecution of cheetahs. Programmes to raise conservation awareness include wildlife theatre, documentary films and animation.

Donate to support Iranian Cheetah Society

Comments

Submitted by Dominic Belfield on

This is the stuff ! !

This is the kind of project to get the blood racing and the heart pounding! There's got to be a good chance that if the people of Iran were to become enthused by the splendour of their wildlife, and cheetahs and leopards in particular, they would rally to the cause of preservation and restoration of healthy ecosystems and habitats.

It might be a turning point in world politics too if the cheetahs and leopards became more widely known and celebrated. Something we could all rally around and be inspired by... More progress might be made on all fronts than we ever dared think possible!

Natural beauty can work wonders.

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