Saving threatened habitats worldwide

Chris Packham named as World Land Trust patron

11 January, 2013 - 16:55 -- World Land Trust
Chris Packham

Chris Packham - charismatic television presenter, spectacular wildlife photographer, author and natural history expert - has become a patron of World Land Trust (WLT).

John Burton, WLT chief executive welcomes the appointment: “This is great news for World Land Trust, and not just because he is a well-known TV presenter. Chris is a very serious wildlife conservationist, and very much a professional zoologist. He takes involvement with conservation organisations extremely seriously and we look forward to his advice and working with him in the future.”

Really wild

"This is great news for World Land Trust, and not just because he is a well-known TV presenter. Chris is a very serious wildlife conservationist, and very much a professional zoologist. He takes involvement with conservation organisations extremely seriously and we look forward to his advice and working with him in the future." (John Burton, Chief Executive, WLT)

Chris’s career as a TV presenter began in 1986 with the award winning Really Wild Show on children’s television. Since then his career has gone from strength to strength. He is now best known for Springwatch and Autumnwatch, two hugely popular programmes that are firm fixtures in the BBC schedule.

Never guilty of dumbing down, Chris fearlessly treads territory that others steadfastly avoid. He has been outspoken in his views on world population, the plight of the panda and badger culling, and he does not kowtow to celebrity status. 

The next David Attenborough?

When recently asked if he considered himself to be the next Sir David Attenborough he replied: “It’s like saying someone’s the next Neil Armstrong. You can only be the first to land on the Moon once. But in terms of Attenborough being an authoritative voice, yes, I would aim towards that. I want people to believe what I say.”

There is no question that Chris is a force to be reckoned with and a very knowledgeable, compassionate force that WLT is delighted to have on board.

Inspiring conservation

In 2010 he was awarded the Dilys Breese British Trust for Ornithology Medal for his outstanding work in promoting science to new audiences and he is passionate about making natural history and conservation inspirational and accessible to everyone no matter where they live.

Chris Packham became a patron of WLT on 1 January 2013. WLT has two other patrons, Sir David Attenborough and David Gower.

Chris Packham will be presenting Winterwatch live from the Highlands of Scotland on BBC2, 14 – 17 January 2013.

Comments

Submitted by Eric Eaxelby-Roberts on

Could you please look into why our local railway company around Teesside is grubbing out and destroying miles of hawthorn hedge rows, not even pruning but flailing and cutting down. These hedges have been here for a hundred years or so and always full of birds, they also create a huge amount of the winter feed for the birds as well as nesting. The farmers have been asked to save the rural hedges, so why are railway company being allowed to destroy our urban hedge rows. It makes no sense to me.

Thanking you

Eric Saxelby-Roberts

Submitted by John A Burton on

This is something that needs to be taken up with your local wildlife Trust or the RSPB. The World Land Trust is an international conservation group, and while we take an active interest in UK conservation issues, we cannot become directly involved in all of those that come to our notice. Thank you for alerting us to the problems, and I hope that something can be done, as hedgerows are still a very scarce resource.

Submitted by Carol Tristram on

There is a bees nest in my garden in a tit box, I am concerned about my grandchildren playing as a result of these bees. They constantly are flying in and out of the box. Not sure what to do about them. I don't want to harm them as my son tells me that bees are protected now.
A concerned grandparent Carol

Submitted by Charlotte Beckham on

Carol, as John says above, WLT is an international conservation organisation, so we are not best placed to advise on this. Generally bees are not agressive but I think you are best to contact your local Wildlife Trust or Buglife. I think action will largely depend on the species of bee and where the nest is located but either of these conservation groups should be able to help you.

Best wishes and I hope it works out well for your bees and your grandchildren!

Charlotte, WLT Conservation Development Assistant  

Submitted by Drek James on

I have come across an old 30ft privet bush which is in full flower. It is covered with dozens of bumble bees.
On the ground there equal dozens of dying and dead bees. I have some photo's should it help. Does anyone know why the bees are dying?

Submitted by John A Burton on

As with the previous questions posted on this page, I can only reiterate that the best organisations to deal with such issues are local County Wildlife Trusts, or specialist natural history societies such as BugLife or Bumble Bee Conservation.

Submitted by Mr James on

Yes John, Thank you. I just thought that if I were to use this platform to show the varied plight of the Bees would help to spread some news and their problems

Read about us

  • News Online
  • RSS
  • eBulletin
  • Green Diary
  • Printed Newsletter

Contact us

Email: info@worldlandtrust.org
Tel: +44 (0)1986 874422
More details »

Follow us

Follow on Facebook  Follow on Twitter  Follow on Linkedin  Follow on GooglePlus  Follow on YouTube